Powerline’s Steven Hayward has been tracking the break up and break down of American universities. By his lights, universities are now dividing between the STEM fields and the rest. More numbers-based fields like economics will find themselves with the STEM fields. (via Maggie’s Farm)

Hayward explained his thought in a lecture at Arizona State University:

I think we’re already seeing the beginnings of a de facto divorce of universities, in which the STEM fields and other “practical” disciplines essentially split off from the humanities and social sciences, not to mention the more politicized departments.

At this rate eventually many of our leading research universities will bifurcate into marginal fever swamps of radicalism whose majors will be unfit for employment at Starbucks, and a larger campus dedicated to science and technology education.


I wonder what this means for CBU. The Left pretty much owns some departments, and their academic standards are pretty much down the drain. But does it have the money to expand STEM subjects?


See what Stuart Schneiderman is thinking.

Does Cape Breton University have a future?

If you are sick and tired of professors indoctrinating students in politicized classes that teach nothing of any use in real life, and hate the idea that tenure immunizes them from accountability, the next decade or so is going to provide some relief. The reckoning is coming, as shocked professors at a University of Wisconsin campus just discovered. The higher education bubble that Professor Glenn Reynolds of Instapundit has forecast to burst has just popped in Stevens Point, Wisconsin.

Here. Sorry, I have forgotten to whose blog I should link.

Provincial – Federal conflict: Trudeau 2.0 vs Ford, Moe, and Kenny

Things have turned very much Jim Karahalios’s way lately, and they might not be done yet. If you haven’t heard of Karahalios, he was the noisy member of the Ontario Progressive Conservatives persecuted by his own party for refusing to let former leader Patrick Brown get away with making carbon taxes an official policy. Although Karahalios clearly spoke for most members, Brown was determined to stick with his carbon tax — and to muzzle Karahalios and his “Axe the Tax” campaign, which has since expanded to every province. Karahalios was even tossed out of PC events and stripped of his PC membership.

With Doug Ford now leading the party into a spring election, the Ontario PC party looks less like Brown’s than it does Karahalios’s, who got his official apology (and the lawsuit appeal dropped) earlier this month from the party. And with Canada’s largest province looking like it might soon be on the same warpath as other provinces against the federal Liberals over the carbon tax, the whole country could soon look more like Karahalios’s sort of place than Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s.

From the Financial Post. Thanks to Blazing Cat Fur.

“Liberalism is a mental disorder.”

 There is an interesting discussion going on at Adrienne’s blog over what is causing Leftists to embrace such obviously insane policy positions. Michael Savage, a talk-radio provocateur, coined an expression a few years ago that “liberalism is a mental disorder.”

More accurately, we would suggest here that Leftist positions and behaviors are symptomatic of underlying psychological pathology. This is especially true among members of the Corporate Media. Everything from looking up to Satanist Sally Quinn as a role model to their repeated public tantrums and dissemination of the most ridiculous conspiracy theories, Media personnel are pretty clearly a mentally-unbalanced lot.

At the top levels of the Far Left: the Clintons, Podesta Brothers, and George Soros, for example; power and profit are the motivating factors. They’ve got good rackets going, fueled by payoffs from special interests and a compliant Media which aids and abets their criminal behaviors. But what about the rank-and-file Leftists?


HereAdrienne’s Blog is here.

Teacher subject to discipline for asking question

The media and the education establishment have advanced their shared agenda recently by egging on students to protest against our right to bear arms rather than attend class. The point is to portray these Astroturf protests as spontaneous expressions of the righteous rage of innocent youth. Actually, the protests were organized by the same professional ultraleft agitators who staged the pussy hat marches. Would educrats give students leave to cut classes for a cause that is not left-wing? A high school teacher in Rocklin, California who asked this question received a definitive answer when she was placed on administrative leave:

Moonbattery has the rest.

Don’t be late

If you aren’t in the job market you should share this advice with anyone you know who is. If you are not going on a job interview any time soon you should apply this advice to all of your business meetings. I would take it a step further and suggest that you should apply this very same advice to your personal relationships, your friendships and even your acquaintanceships.

The advice comes from William Vanderbloemen, a man who has considerable experience interviewing job candidates.


The university divided.

In January, news came out that Emory University received a $400 million gift from the Woodruff Foundation. All of it will go to healthcare and research. That’s $100 million more than Michael Bloomberg’s foundation gave to the school of public health at Johns Hopkins in September 2016. Emory’s school of public health is ranked only six spots behind Hopkins’ (no. 1), though it opened relatively recently in 1990. You can sense the energy when you walk into the building and mingle with the 1,300 or so master’s and doctoral students and 168 faculty members.

That part of the campus has an entirely different feel from the side where I teach my classes. The older areas where the liberal arts are housed have a nice, bucolic aspect—a grass quad, lovely but modest marble buildings dating back a century, and professors and students alone and in pairs, laden with books, passing in and out of the library.

First Things has the essay.

A return to Steven Pinker

Some few courageous souls have not been taken in by Steven Pinker’s version of the Enlightenment. Today, in the New York Times Jennifer Szalai vigorously opposes Pinker’s Panglossian optimism. She is none too impressed by his seductive effort to grant his version of the Enlightenment credit for everything that is right with the world and denigrating the Counter Enlightenment as the cause of everything that is wrong. As Bill Gates, the world’s richest dupe, drools over Pinker’s seductive wiles, Szalai offers us a better, more balanced approach.

As she suggests, Pinker’s theory seems to be: Don’t worry; be happy. You will immediately understand that if you bask in happiness and ignore all dangers, you will run straight into a ditch. You will not see it coming. It will descend upon you like a black swan. After all, writers at the turn of the twentieth century were declaring that humanity had achieved a higher plane of existence, the kind that would end wars and famines and oppression. How did that one work out?

Stuart Schneiderman again, this time with Jennifer Szalai.